Yesterday I got a wonderful session of Zero Balancing from its founder, Dr. Fritz Smith.  One of the biggest learnings was connected with shame.

You know, most of us when we look closely have some sense of shame.  We feel we’re not good enough, especially when things get challenging.

We may tell ourselves inside, “You shouldn’t be this way.”  And those feelings and thoughts make us feel less than we are.

So in this session I experienced that shaming is totally unnecessary, how it didn’t serve me one bit.  And then felt the shame leave various aspects of my body and life.  It just lifted off like a gray cloud, floated away and disippated.  What a relief!

Shame feels bad because we know it’s not our true self – we’re naturally uncomfortable when in shame – and we do things to try to recapture our sense of self-worth.

Later I was talking with Fritz about it and he said he thought it wasn’t “my” shame, but that it was ancestral.  That made sense to me.  When I feel shame it doesn’t feel like me.  And within the Jewish tradition there’s a strong amount of Woody Allen-ness.   He’s funny, but you know in reality he is quite ashamed, internally very uncomfortable.  His honesty about this is part of what makes us laugh with nervous relief when he trots out his various neuroses.

Note that your sense of shame, or not being good enough, is usually not coming from you.  It’s not your essence.  It is an archetypal feeling picked up along the pathways of past generations.

Feel free to set that down.  Set shame aside and just let it go;  let go of shame from your body, mind, and heart.

Know that you are worthy of your own respect.

And it may be, like me, that you are empowered to do this, by just such a kind person touching you with clarity, skill, kindness and respect to let go of these feelings which have been unknowingly passed down for generations.

Enjoy who you really are.