Muscle-specific Deep Tissue Massage: The Sacro-Iliac Joint

What a fascinating world that of the sacro-iliac is! By David Lauterstein The SI Joint is the transitional joint from the axial to the appendicular system. On a deeper level, the axial system is, in a sense, who we are and the appendicular can be viewed as how we interact with the world around us. So the sacroiliac joint (SI) emobodies the interface of our being and our doing. If the SI Joi...
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How to Improve the Effectiveness of Your Back Massage

Muscle Specific Deep Tissue Techniques Can be Integrated into Any Session By Brian Utting The phrase ‘deep tissue work’ is used in so many contexts that it’s hard to know what it means anymore. To some practitioners, ‘deep tissue’ simply means deep pressure. To others, it has more fascial, myofascial, or structural connotations. Muscle-Specific Deep Tissue work (MSDT) still works with the fasc...
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Tips & Tricks to Empower Your Massage Clients: Self-Massage for the Wrists

Educating Your Clients in Self-care is a Powerful Way to Support Their Health - and Your Business We put together this video as a tool to share with your massage clients to help them understand how to perform self-massage for the wrists and feel empowered to help manage their own aches and pains between sessions with you, their massage therapist. Feel free to share. https://video214.com/pla...
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Five Helpful Anatomy Apps for Massage Therapists (and Students)

Whether you are just starting as a massage student are are already a therapist, there is no reason to be overwhelmed by anatomy. Why? Because technology affords today's bodyworkers so many mobile resources. Here are some of our favorite anatomy apps for massage therapists and students, alike! Learn Muscles: Anatomy Quiz and Reference by RealBodywork This app is a reference, testing and ed...
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LEARNING ANATOMY – CURSE? THEN A BIGGER BLESSING!

Anatomy is a sacred genesis. We ought not consider the organs of the body as the lifeless forms of a mechanical mass, but as the living, active instruments of the soul.” - Pehr Henrik Ling When people first start massage school they are thrilled to give and receive massages, but sometimes students are not so overjoyed about learning anatomy and physiology. The effort it takes to learn this new ...
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THE LOW BACK AND THE ERECTOR SPINAE

Re-root the back! By David Lauterstein The back does so much for us – helping us stand, twist, turn, bend forward and back.  It’s no surprise the back requires a complicated interweaving and interaction of many muscles.  One of the main groups is called the erector spinae. I never understood the erector spinae until I saw a lovely illustration in Carmine Clemente’s “Regional Atlas of Human ...
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A Brief History of Anatomy Trains

Tom Myers, the founder of Anatomy Trains, says: “I developed the Anatomy Trains during the 1990’s as a game for students to play when I was teaching Fascial Anatomy at the Rolf Institute . All the books you can find put forward the ‘single-muscle’ theory, but Ida Rolf kept saying, “It’s all connected through the fascia.” Other than invoking the image of a grapefruit or a loofah, how do you make th...
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Anatomy Trains Comes to Austin!

Anatomy Trains is a unique map of the ‘anatomy of connection’ – whole-body fascial and myofascial linkages. The Anatomy Trains concept joins individual muscles into functional complexes within fascial planes – each with a defined anatomy and ‘meaning’ in human movement. Anatomy Trains leads to practical new holistic strategies to improve stability, coordination, and resolve long-standing compen...
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Anatomy Review: Massage for the Scalenes

The scalenes are actually the uppermost of the intercostals muscles, those muscles lying between your ribs that assist inhalation and exhalation. However, big surprise, there are no ribs in the neck! Actually a number of books say the scalenes attach to the vestigial ribs of the cervical vertebrae. That is, little buds appear on the cervical vertebrae that in fish, for instance, would develop into...
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Anatomy Review: The Erector Spinae System

Origin: Sacrum and iliac crest of pelvis, Insertion: All ribs, transverse and spinous processes of all vertebrae up to C2; mastoid process of the temporal bone, Action: Bilateral: extension of the spine, (Excessive – lumbar and cervical lordosis; thoracic kyphosis), Unilateral: lateral flexion (Excessive – scoliosis), Antagonist: Rectus abdominis (or gravity) The erector spinae is more a whole ...
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