Tips & Tricks to Empower Your Massage Clients: Self-Massage for the Wrists

Educating Your Clients in Self-care is a Powerful Way to Support Their Health - and Your Business We put together this video as a tool to share with your massage clients to help them understand how to perform self-massage for the wrists and feel empowered to help manage their own aches and pains between sessions with you, their massage therapist. Feel free to share. https://video214.com/pla...
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Five Helpful Anatomy Apps for Massage Therapists (and Students)

Whether you are just starting as a massage student are are already a therapist, there is no reason to be overwhelmed by anatomy. Why? Because technology affords today's bodyworkers so many mobile resources. Here are some of our favorite anatomy apps for massage therapists and students, alike! Learn Muscles: Anatomy Quiz and Reference by RealBodywork This app is a reference, testing and ed...
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LEARNING ANATOMY – CURSE? THEN A BIGGER BLESSING!

Anatomy is a sacred genesis. We ought not consider the organs of the body as the lifeless forms of a mechanical mass, but as the living, active instruments of the soul.” - Pehr Henrik Ling When people first start massage school they are thrilled to give and receive massages, but sometimes students are not so overjoyed about learning anatomy and physiology. The effort it takes to learn this new ...
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A Brief History of Anatomy Trains

Tom Myers, the founder of Anatomy Trains, says: “I developed the Anatomy Trains during the 1990’s as a game for students to play when I was teaching Fascial Anatomy at the Rolf Institute . All the books you can find put forward the ‘single-muscle’ theory, but Ida Rolf kept saying, “It’s all connected through the fascia.” Other than invoking the image of a grapefruit or a loofah, how do you make th...
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Anatomy Trains Comes to Austin!

Anatomy Trains is a unique map of the ‘anatomy of connection’ – whole-body fascial and myofascial linkages. The Anatomy Trains concept joins individual muscles into functional complexes within fascial planes – each with a defined anatomy and ‘meaning’ in human movement. Anatomy Trains leads to practical new holistic strategies to improve stability, coordination, and resolve long-standing compen...
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Anatomy Review: Massage for the Scalenes

The scalenes are actually the uppermost of the intercostals muscles, those muscles lying between your ribs that assist inhalation and exhalation. However, big surprise, there are no ribs in the neck! Actually a number of books say the scalenes attach to the vestigial ribs of the cervical vertebrae. That is, little buds appear on the cervical vertebrae that in fish, for instance, would develop into...
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Anatomy Review: The Erector Spinae System

Origin: Sacrum and iliac crest of pelvis, Insertion: All ribs, transverse and spinous processes of all vertebrae up to C2; mastoid process of the temporal bone, Action: Bilateral: extension of the spine, (Excessive – lumbar and cervical lordosis; thoracic kyphosis), Unilateral: lateral flexion (Excessive – scoliosis), Antagonist: Rectus abdominis (or gravity) The erector spinae is more a whole ...
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Anatomy Review: Pregnancy Massage and the Migration of Fascia

Did you know it is basically a law of structure that under compression fascia will "migrate" laterally? Think of pressing down on a beach ball. The more you press, the further out each of its color segments would get. This is exactly what happens to the pregnant woman under the compression of the extra weight carried during pregnancy. The muscles and fascia under compression particularly in the...
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Anatomy Review: Rhomboids

Origin: Minor: Medial border of scapula above spine, Major: Medial border of scapula below spine Insertion: Minor: C7 & T1, Major: T2 –T5 Action: Retraction of scapula (Excessive: pain between scapula) Antagonist: Serratus Anterior and Pectoralis Major The usual mechanistic approach to rounded shoulders is to strengthen the rhomboids thus theoretically “squaring” the shoulders. This is based ...
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Anatomy Review: Introduction to the Torso

The word "torso" comes from the Latin word "thysus" meaning stalk or stem. The spine within the torso forms a kind of fifth limb within us. The vertebral column runs through the center of the body, up through the neck and becomes the cranium. The muscles, the organs, the bones and other tissues of the torso surround the spine, "fleshing it out," so to speak, just as the muscles and other tissues o...
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